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Carbon dating shroud

carbon dating shroud-4

L., Sindon 24, 31, 1982, pp 5-9; Baima Bollone, P., Gaglio, A.

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Animals absorb C14 into their tissues by eating plants.The shroud has been subjected to numerous scientific tests over the years culminating in 1988 with a radiocarbon measurement and dating procedure.The testing of the shroud and the conclusions reached lie basically in two areas, the physical shroud itself and the very unique image on the shroud.This article was published in 3 parts in The Glyph, the journal of The Archaeological Institute of America, San Diego, Vol 1, No. What are the facts and how do we separate the facts from both religious and scientific bias and agenda-based conclusions? Schwortz's No single artifact of the past has so exemplified the interface between science and religion as the Shroud of Turin.FACT: The iron oxide, abundant on the linen of the shroud is not the remnant of artist’s pigment. Adler then proceeded to apply microspectrophotometric analysis of a "blood particle" from one of the fibrils of the shroud and unmistakeably identified hemoglobin in the acid methemoglobin form due to great age and denaturation.

Further tests by Heller and Adler established, within scientific certainty, the presence of porphyrin, bilirubin, albumin and protein.

Shroud photographs (not appearing in original article) are from Barrie M.

First, we must separate the shroud from that which is responsible for bias, namely that it is the burial shroud of Jesus of Nazareth and investigate it instead as a putative artifact of a first century crucifixion and burial.

Applying pleochroism, birefringence and chemical analysis, they determined that, unlike artist’s pigment which contains iron oxide contaminated with manganese, nickel and cobalt, the iron oxide on the shroud was relatively pure.

They discovered, through research into the procedures of flax preparation and linen manufacture, that pure iron oxide is normal to the process of fermenting (retting) the flax in large outdoor vats of water.

A part of the answer to this was provided by x-ray fluorescent analysis performed by STURP (Shroud of Turin Research Project) scientists R. Were these genuine bloodstains or were they "painted" with some form of iron-oxide containing red pigment?