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Dating violence statistics and facts

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Cell phones, messaging and social networks are intended for communication and social interaction.In evaluating your child’s experience with these technologies ask them to consider the difference between communication and monitoring.

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Emotional abuse may include isolating a dating partner by trying to control the time they spend with friends and family, limiting the activities someone is involved in, or humiliating a dating partner through social sabotage.In talking with your kids about sensible guidelines, let them know that you are interested in helping them use technology safely, not in restricting their use of these devices.If your child fears that you will limit their access to their phone or computer, they might not confide in you if they are experiencing digital abuse.Kids who are being abused by a partner may: If you see these red flags in your teen’s relationship, it’s important that you speak up and let them know you’re concerned.We have more information on talking to your kid about teen dating violence .Most female victims of intimate partner violence were previously victimized by the same offender, including 77% of females ages 18 to 24, 76% of females ages 25 to 34, and 81% of females ages 35 to 49.[x]81% of women who experienced rape, stalking, or physical violence by an intimate partner reported significant short- or long-term impacts such as post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms and injury.[iii]An estimated 13% of women and 6% of men have experienced sexual coercion in their lifetime (i.e.

unwanted sexual penetration after being pressured in a nonphysical way).

Why do Women Use Force or Violence in Intimate Partner Relationships?

According to the National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline, teen dating violence (TDV) is a pattern of behavior that someone uses to gain control over his or her dating partner.

Sometimes abusers use technology—texting, calls, instant messages, or social networking sites—to check up on a partner and try to control their behavior.

TDV may include sexual violence including any kind of unwanted or forced sexual contact.

27.2% of women and 11.7% of men have experienced unwanted sexual contact (by any perpetrator).[vii]One in 6 women (16.2%) and 1 in 19 men (5.2%) in the United States have experienced stalking victimization at some point during their lifetime in which they felt very fearful or believed that they or someone close to them would be harmed or killed (by any perpetrator).[i]Repeatedly receiving unwanted telephone calls, voice, or text messages was the most commonly experienced stalking tactic for both female and male victims of stalking (78.8% for women and 75.9% for men).[iv]About 1 in 5 women and nearly 1 in 7 men who ever experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner, first experienced some form of partner violence between 11 and 17 years of age.[ii]Most female and male victims of rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner (69% of female victims, 53% of male victims) experienced some form of intimate partner violence for the first time before 25 years of age.[vii]A survey of American employees found that 44% of full-time employed adults personally experienced domestic violence’s effect in their workplaces, and 21% identified themselves as victims of intimate partner violence.[iii]64% of the respondents in a 2005 survey who identified themselves as victims of domestic violence indicated that their ability to work was affected by the violence.