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Free cellphone sex shows live no credit card

Free cellphone sex shows live no credit card-27

It could be a scam, says Jason Schall, an attorney with the Federal Trade Commission.

The solution: Skip the link, and just log in to your account as usual, he advises.If you are (or have already been) hit by this scam, contact the FBI's Internet Crime Complaints Center."You very well could have the one piece of information" that could help catch the criminals, says Savage. 4: Late utility bill The scam: Your utility company calls: You're behind on the bill.And if you do get scammed, "don't be so embarrassed that you don't report it," King says. 2: Sneaky phone charges The scam: Phone bill creeping upward?You could be a victim of "cramming." Many phone companies allow you to pay for third-party services by having charges added to your phone bill. But sometimes scammers attempt to have phantom fees added to those bills, says Duane Pozza, an attorney in the financial practices division of the Federal Trade Commission.But, just as with magic tricks, ruses lose their power when you know exactly how they work. Here's the lowdown on eight hot scams, cons and swindles that criminals are employing to separate you from your money, along with a few strategies for avoiding them. 1: 'Card security' scam The scam: Your get an automated call: Suspicious charges have been detected on your credit or debit card. Press "2" for a live attendant, who will reinstate your card after "confirming" personal information, such as your name, Social Security number, account number and date of birth.

Criminals playing the odds may even mention your actual bank by name and that, plus the robo-calling feature, "makes it seem more credible," says Gary K. "They reach out to thousands of people and know that someone will bite," he says.

The charges are often small, anywhere from $1 to $9.99. One third-party billing operation had to refund more than $1 million to consumers, as part of a settlement with the FTC, says Pozza.

Another settled for a $10.9 million judgment, he says. If you don't recognize a charge, call your phone company for an explanation, Pozza says, and request a refund for anything you didn't authorize.

It works because you downloaded something secretly salted with malware, which the criminal used to hijack your computer and encrypt your data or operating system, says Savage.

The tipoff: Government agencies and private software companies don't lock up computers and assess fines.

C., field office Depending on the variation, you may see a warning banner from a "government agency" or "software maker." In a different type of attack, known as Cryptolocker, you might simply get a pop-up message demanding ransom in exchange for the encryption key to restore the machine, he says.