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Second base in dating

second base in dating-60

She changed her email address after her first message from [email protected] [email protected], claiming that her old email account was working badly. Her first message contained someone else's full name (a Westerner), making it appear as though my name and a few sentences had been added to an existing message. She never gave specific details about her life, claiming that she lived with her "mum" and that her father had left her at the age of 3 (sound familiar? She consistently relied on her "mum" for advice and described very realistic conversations with her and also her grandmother (sound familiar? She was incredibly beautiful and as I later found out, had sent me a photograph from when she was much younger. She knew more about the workings of Western Union than I did. She already had a passport, which was very surprising for someone who was so poor and lived so deep in Russia (Kirov). She claimed to have an aunt who worked for an airline in Moscow and who could get tickets for her at a discount, even though I wanted to buy them myself (sound familiar? She required $350 for her visa application because she claimed to be using the services of a firm in Kirov (sound familiar? She promised that she would somehow pay it back to me after she arrived, but never explained how.

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Money usually is requested via Western Union or Money Gram, first for visa, then for tickets, then for insurance. Her name is Ksenia Mihailovna Maksimova, 424007 Russia, Republic Mari-El, city Yoshkar-Ola Street Petrova, house 42, flat 81.That deadline seemed to "stretch" further and further out, at which point she would only reply to my messages when I indicated that I might be sending her the money (which of course, I never did).One of her photos showed Stockholm harbor and the Swedish Royal Palace in the background. Most "writers" are male students of the local university, department of foreign languages. According to our information, there are many scam groups in Yoshkar-Ola that are using photos of young women and write letters to men pretending to be "a Russian woman seeking for a husband".She had earlier claimed to only have access to a computer at work or the Internet Cafe.

By the way, she declined when I suggested she sell her PC and stereo to pay for the "insurance".

*She* found me on Friend Finder and succeeded in taking over $1000 of my money before I realized that it was a scam. She very quickly proclaimed her love for me and included poetry, which she claimed to have written for me, in several of her messages (sound familiar?

Here are the clues that should have raised my suspicions: 1. )I finally became quite suspicious after she insisted that she required "insurance" before she would come to America.

90 Ekalova Street Yoshkar-Ola, Russia 424028 Finally, I was able to track *her* emails back to a phone number in Yoshkar-Ola that is registered under the name Evgeny Borisov, Building 21, Apt. The phone number she uses to access the Internet is ( 7-8362) 72-89-08.

Finally, after posting my story on this website, I received a message from "Galina" several weeks later stating that "she" was returning $1000 of my money, in the hope that I would remove all references to her and Evgeny Borisov from this site. She needs 100dollars for the Internet but she doesn't even have a phone to connect to the internet and she goes from writing letters at a girlfriend to writing from her computer.

Using poor English she seemed to be prompted what to say. The letters from her were said to be via software translation.